EUROPEAN COMMISSION

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION

Please use our A-Z INDEX to navigate this site

 

 

 

 

The European Commission have devised a plan to encourage the development of technologies for the sustainable development of the EU in line with their SDG agenda. This includes many initiatives to reduce greenhouse gases in industry, transport and home building, some examples of which will be featured on this and other pages in a progressive review of the State of the Union.

 

 

- - - -

Jean-Claude Juncker

President

Frans Timmermans

1st Vice President

Federica Mogherini

High Representative, V. President

Andrus Ansip

Vice President

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Maroš Šefčovič

Vice President

Valdis Dombrovskis

Vice President

Jyrki Katainen

Vice President

Günther H. Oettinger

Commissioner

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Johannes Hahn

Commissioner

Cecilia Malmström

Commissioner

Neven Mimica

Commissioner

Miguel Arias Cañete

Commissioner

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Karmenu Vella

Commissioner

Vytenis Andriukaitis

Commissioner

Dimitris Avramopoulos

Commissioner

Marianne Thyssen

Commissioner

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Pierre Moscovici

Commissioner

Christos Stylianides

Commissioner

Phil Hogan

Commissioner

Violeta Bulc

Commissioner

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Elżbieta Bieńkowska

Commissioner

Věra Jourová

Commissioner

Tibor Navracsics

Commissioner

Corina Crețu

Commissioner

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Margrethe Vestager

Commissioner

Carlos Moedas

Commissioner

Julian King

Commissioner

Mariya Gabriel

Commissioner

 

 

 

 

CARBON EMISSIONS and OCEAN LITTER ?

Two examples of calls for proposals that hold great potential in terms of ocean regeneration are:

 

1. Decarbonising Long Distance Shipping: September 2019 - January 2020, and

 

2. Pilot Action for the removal of Marine Litter: October 2019 - January 2020.

 

 

HORIZON CALL: SEPTEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020 - DECARBONISING LONG DISTANCE SHIPPING

 

In relation to the targets for the above call the Commission envisage that working together with, for example operators, ship builders, marine equipment manufacturers, fuel and energy suppliers and others research will address the development of technologies combined with operational practices to substantially reduce GHG emissions from long distance shipping in line with the IMO's targets, without increasing other forms of pollution.

 

 

 

 

HORIZON CALL: OCTOBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020 - PILOT ACTION FOR REMOVAL OF MARINE LITTER

Urgent action is needed both for the prevention and for the removal of existing marine litter, notably plastics and microplastics.
Microplastics can get into the food chain, together with the integrated and adsorbed toxins. It is estimated that each year 5 to 13 million tonnes plastics reach the seas and oceans (worldwide), becoming eventually the main source of microplastics. In addition to possible health risks, the damage to marine ecosystems and the blue economy (tourism and other maritime sectors) due to plastic litter are enormous.

 

 

 

Shipping’ can be considered as truly an international industry. This is because it serves more than 90% of the world’s trade by the cargo transportation and other merchant ships that do so cleanly and cost effectively. As a result, any particular ship can be governed by a management chain that spans many countries, also these ships spend most of their times at sea between various jurisdictions. Therefore, it was felt in the beginning of the last century that there was a need of a universal governing body that in turn laid down rules and standards to regulate the shipping process and the industry worldwide. Thus the International maritime organization came into being.

 

 

BIODIVERSITY COP HISTORY

 

COP 1: 1994 Nassau, Bahamas, Nov & Dec

COP 8: 2006 Curitiba, Brazil, 8 Mar

COP 2: 1995 Jakarta, Indonesia, Nov

COP 9: 2008 Bonn, Germany, May

COP 3: 1996 Buenos Aires, Argentina, Nov

COP 10: 2010 Nagoya, Japan, Oct

COP 4: 1998 Bratislava, Slovakia, May

COP 11: 2012 Hyderabad, India

EXCOP: 1999 Cartagena, Colombia, Feb

COP 12: 2014 Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea, Oct

COP 5: 2000 Nairobi, Kenya, May

COP 13: 2016 Cancun, Mexico, 2 to 17 Dec

COP 6: 2002 The Hague, Netherlands, April

COP 14: 2018 Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, 17 to 29 Nov

COP 7: 2004 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Feb

COP 15: 2020 Kunming, Yunnan, China

 

 

DESERTIFICATION COP HISTORY

 

COP 1: Rome, Italy, 29 Sept to 10 Oct 1997

COP 9: Buenos Aires, Argentina, 21 Sept to 2 Oct 2009

COP 2: Dakar, Senegal, 30 Nov to 11 Dec 1998

COP 10: Changwon, South Korea, 10 to 20 Oct 2011

COP 3: Recife, Brazil, 15 to 26 Nov 1999

COP 11: Windhoek, Namibia, 16 to 27 Sept 2013

COP 4: Bonn, Germany, 11 to 22 Dec 2000

COP 12: Ankara, Turkey, 12 to 23 Oct 2015

COP 5: Geneva, Switzerland, 1 to 12 Oct 2001

COP 13: Ordos City, China, 6 to 16 Sept 2017

COP 6: Havana, Cuba, 25 August to 5 Sept 2003

COP 14: New Delhi, India, 2 to 13 Sept 2019

COP 7: Nairobi, Kenya, 17 to 28 Oct 2005

COP 15:  2020

COP 8: Madrid, Spain, 3 to 14 Sept 2007

COP 16:  2021

 

 

CLIMATE CHANGE COP HISTORY

 

1995 COP 1, BERLIN, GERMANY

2008 COP 14/CMP 4, POZNAN, POLAND

1996 COP 2, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2009 COP 15/CMP 5, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

1997 COP 3, KYOTO, JAPAN

2010 COP 16/CMP 6, CANCUN, MEXICO

1998 COP 4, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

2011 COP 17/CMP 7, DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

1999 COP 5, BONN, GERMANY

2012 COP 18/CMP 8, DOHA, QATAR

2000:COP 6, THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS

2013 COP 19/CMP 9, WARSAW, POLAND

2001 COP 7, MARRAKECH, MOROCCO

2014 COP 20/CMP 10, LIMA, PERU

2002 COP 8, NEW DELHI, INDIA

2015 COP 21/CMP 11, Paris, France

2003 COP 9, MILAN, ITALY

2016 COP 22/CMP 12/CMA 1, Marrakech, Morocco

2004 COP 10, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

2017 COP 23/CMP 13/CMA 2, Bonn, Germany

2005 COP 11/CMP 1, MONTREAL, CANADA

2018 COP 24/CMP 14/CMA 3, Katowice, Poland

2006 COP 12/CMP 2, NAIROBI, KENYA

2019 COP 25/CMP 15/CMA 4, Santiago, Chile

2007 COP 13/CMP 3, BALI, INDONESIA

2020 COP 26/CMP 16/CMA 5, to be announced

 

 

 

 

 

EU CONTACTS

 

....

 

 

EUROPEAN MARITIME DAY THEMES

 

* Brussels 2008: "A regional approach to the implementation of Maritime Policy"

* Rome 2009: "Integrated Maritime Policy and the contribution of maritime clusters" 

* Gijón 2010: "How to foster innovation?"

* Gdansk 2011: "Maritime Policy: Putting People First"

* Gothenburg 2012: "Sustainable Growth from the Oceans, Seas and Coasts"

* Valletta 2013: "Coastal Development and Sustainable Maritime Tourism"

* Bremen 2014: "Innovation driving Blue Growth"

* Piraeus 2015: "Ports and Coasts, Gateways to Maritime Growth"

* Turku 2016: "Investing in blue growth – smart and sustainable solutions"

* Poole 2017: "The Future of our Seas"

* Burgas 2018: Bulgaria "TBA"

* Lisbon 2019: Portugal "TBA"

* Cork 2020: Ireland "TBA"

* Den Helder 2021: The Netherlands "TBA"

* Ravenna 2022: Italy "TBA"

* Brest 2023: France "TBA"

* Svendborg 2024: Denmark "TBA"

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCES

 

https://www

 

 

 

 This website is provided on a free basis as a public information service. copyright © Climate Change Trust 2019. Solar Studios, BN271RF, United Kingdom.

 

 

EUROPEAN COMMISSIONERS A TO Z MINISTERS AND RESEARCH INNOVATION INITIATIVES